Cinnamon (Dalchini) Tree

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Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy 247 kJ (59 kcal)
Carbohydrates
80.6 g
Sugars 2.2 g
Dietary fiber 53.1 g
Fat
1.2 g
Protein
4 g
Vitamins Quantity%DV
Vitamin A equiv.
2%

15 μg

Thiamine (B1)
2%

0.02 mg

Riboflavin (B2)
3%

0.04 mg

Niacin (B3)
9%

1.33 mg

Vitamin B6
12%

0.16 mg

Folate (B9)
2%

6 μg

Vitamin C
5%

3.8 mg

Vitamin E
15%

2.3 mg

Vitamin K
30%

31.2 μg

Minerals Quantity%DV
Calcium
100%

1002 mg

Iron
64%

8.3 mg

Magnesium
17%

60 mg

Phosphorus
9%

64 mg

Potassium
9%

431 mg

Sodium
1%

10 mg

Zinc
19%

1.8 mg

Other constituents Quantity
Water 10.6 g
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Description

Cinnamon is a spice obtained from the inner bark of several tree species from the genus Cinnamomum. Cinnamon is used mainly as an aromatic condiment and flavouring additive in a wide variety of cuisines, sweet and savoury dishes, breakfast cereals, snackfoods, tea and traditional foods. The aroma and flavour of cinnamon derive from its essential oil and principal component, cinnamaldehyde, as well as numerous other constituents, including eugenol.

Close-up view of raw cinnamon

The term “cinnamon” also is used to describe its mid-brown colour. Cinnamon is the name for several species of trees and the commercial spice products that some of them produce. All are members of the genus Cinnamomum in the family Lauraceae.[1] Only a few Cinnamomum species are grown commercially for spice. Cinnamomum verum is sometimes considered to be “true cinnamon”, but most cinnamon in international commerce is derived from related species, also referred to as “cassia”.[2][3] In 2016, Indonesia and China produced 75% of the world’s supply of cinnamon.

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